Status: alive. Looks like: pumpkin ash Twigs are smooth but sometimes fuzzy, gray-brown, with oval leaf scars. Plant Notes: Whittemore et al. USDA Plants Database Form: Small tree up to 30 feet, 6 inches in diameter. Native/Naturalized: Native to Virginia. For these reasons, conservation and the facilitation of resistance through breeding are high priorities. Common Name: CAROLINA ASH; WATER ASH; POP ASH. symbol: FRCA3. Fraxinus caroliniana, or Carolina Water Ash, is a rather small, long-lived deciduous tree or shrub that is native to the southeastern US, often enlarged at the base and leaning, with a rounded or narrow crown. Ash (Fraxinus sp.) This plant has no children Legal Status. Flower: Species is dioecious; in clusters, green to purple, appearing in spring. External Links: ... Gaillardia spp. North Carolina coastal plain and Piedmont. Ranges of selected ash species (Schlesinger 2004: Fraxinus americana L; Seiler et al 2003: Fraxinus caroliniana fact sheet; Seiler et al 2003: Fraxinus Larval host plant for Eastern tiger swallowtail. General Comments: The Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis) is a very destructive wood-boring beetle native to Asia.It was discovered in North America in July 2002, and has become established in Michigan, New York, Ohio and Ontario (Canada). All material © 2019 Virginia Tech Dept. Additional Range Information: All species look alike microscopically. The name fraxinus is the classical Latin name for ash. Typically, the tree grows to 25 feet tall with a diameter of 6 to 8 inches. - green ash Cooperative Extension prohibits discrimination and harassment on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, sex (including pregnancy), disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, and veteran status. caroliniana Mill. Oleaceae. Range may be expanded by planting. Flattened broad-wing samaras are 1 1/2 to 2 inches long and 1/2- 3/4 inches wide. Status: alive. Cercis canadensis Malus spp. Fraxinus caroliniana, or Carolina Water Ash, is a rather small, long-lived deciduous tree or shrub that is native to the southeastern US, often enlarged at the base and leaning, with a rounded or narrow crown. Fact Sheets & Plant Guides: Introduced, Invasive, and Noxious Plants : Threatened & Endangered: Wetland Indicator Status ... Fraxinus caroliniana Mill. Scientific Name: Fraxinus caroliniana. Similar to those of other ash species. Leaf: Opposite, pinnately compound, 5 to 7 leaflets, leaflets 2 to 4 inches long with a usually serrated margin, leaf 5 to 10 inches long, dark green above, paler and smooth below. Comments: The tree is healthy and sound. They bloom in May. Carolina ash (Fraxinus caroliniana) and pumpkin ash (F. profunda) are among six species that face severe pest threats, but have a high capacity to adapt (according to CAPTURE project). Fifield Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611-0670 Phone: (352) 392-1831; Fax (352) 392-3870. Carolina ash Cosmos spp. Points: 141 . Perry, Leonard. Compound (Pinnately , Bipinnately, Palmately). Oleaceae Throughout the southeaster states. – Carolina ash Subordinate Taxa. It is an important forage plant for deer and seeds are eaten by waterfowl, which also use it for roosting. Cephalanthus occidentalis Fraxinus caroliniana Frangula caroliniana Gelsemium sempervirens Chrysanthemum spp. Bark: Scaly, gray to slightly orange-brown, splotchy. Matures from July to October. Cornus florida Fothergilla spp. © 2013 | Site Feedback |; University of Florida | ; IFAS |; 1549 W.M. N.C. The control methods referred to in this fact sheet should be used in accordance with the restrictions (federal and state legislation, and local government laws) directly or indirectly related to each control method. Wood Technology Transfer Fact Sheet Fraxinus spp. The name fraxinus is the classical Latin name for ash. Leaf: Opposite, pinnately compound, 5 to 7 leaflets, leaflets 2 to 4 inches long with a usually serrated margin, leaf 5 to 10 inches long, dark green above, paler and smooth below. Overall feel is thick and smooth. The violet wings hang well below the seed portion and there can be 2 to 3 wings. Coleus spp. North America is divided into many ecologically distinct regions. Virginia Tech Dendrology. Scaly bark, gray to slightly orange-brown, sometimes splotchy. Date Last Measured: 2016. form a strategic partnership called N.C. Twig: Moderate, smooth or may be somewhat fuzzy, gray-brown, opposite leaf scars oval with lateral bud only slightly set down into leaf scar. Ash (Fraxinus sp.) Height: 75 ft. Crown: 33 ft. is composed of 40 to 70 species, with 21 in Central and North America and 50 species in Eurasia.All species look alike microscopically. Flower: Species is dioecious; in clusters, green to purple, appearing in spring. The pinnately compound leaves have 5 to 9 leaflets and are 7 to 12 inches long. Use it in wet areas of the yard or where there is frequent standing water, pond margins, boggy areas or low-lying sites. Diseases, Insects, and Other Plant Problems: Susceptible to the Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis), a very destructive wood-boring beetle native to Asia. Common Name: Carolina ash. Fraxinus caroliniana is native to North America. Male flowers are in a dense mass while female flowers are a more open cluster or panicle. This continent has a great diversity of plant life, much of which lends itself to residential and commercial landscapes. The leaves are interesting, fairly large and pinnately compound. Dappled Sunlight (Shade through upper canopy all day), Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours). Green to purplish flowers are dioecious and appear in spring in clusters before the leaves. Upperside is dark green and the underside is paler and smooth. The winged seed pods hang in groups and add additional interest. GH001. Virginia Champion: no. Irregular scaly ridges develop with age. Cooperative Extension, which staffs local offices in all 100 counties and with the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Carolina ash Oleaceae Fraxinus caroliniana Mill. These restrictions may prevent the use of one or more of the methods referred to, depending on individual circumstances. Wetland Status. National Champion: no. Millions of ash trees have been killed in the northeastern US. In nature it is an understory tree in moist to wet, shady sites with acidic soil. NC State University and N.C. A&T State University work in tandem, along with federal, state and local governments, to It was discovered in North America in July 2002, and has become established in Michigan, New York, Ohio and Ontario (Canada).