Here is a slightly expanded version of the pentatonic blues box. Once you’ve got the pentatonic scale deeply engrained, you can try adding in those extra notes. If you already know about the minor blues scale and would just like to know how to play it in five positions as well as the open position of A, read on. If you want to start playing lead guitar, improvising blues and rock, or writing classic sounding rock tunes, the pentatonic blues scale is definitely the place to start. I hope this lesson has been useful to you. After the pentatonic minor scale and major scale, the blues scale is probably the most widely-used scale in guitar improvisation.Despite its name, the blues scale is not only used in blues music; it’s also regularly used in rock, metal, jazz, and many other musical styles. You can’t talk about blues on the guitar without mentioning the so-called blues scale, which is really just a pentatonic scale with a chromatic passing tone. This added note is often referred to as the "blue note". A Minor Blues Scale Positions. The Blues Scale is an extension of the Minor Pentatonic Scale adding the 5♭ note of the scale.. So, in the chart above we have expanded the pentatonic scale showing the positions on a larger are of fretboard. Your email address will not be published. You can build up speed later. The Blues Scale is an extension of the Minor Pentatonic Scale adding the 5♭ note of the scale.. The first mode that you will explore in this lesson outside of the minor blues scale is the melodic minor scale. Obviously, the notes of any scale are repeated up and down the fretboard. This added note is often referred to as the "blue note". Now, this is a good scale just for noodling with at home, but it really is worth jamming along with other players. I strongly advise getting hold of some pentatonic backing tracks and trying out some licks – you’ll be amazed at how great it can sound! Here are a selection of easy licks to get you started – all are in the key of A, but the basic pattern can be moved to any key, up or down the neck. © 2008 - 2020 GuitaristSource.com | All Rights Reserved. For further information on these modes, see understanding modes. This lick only uses the pentatonic blues scale box. Make sure the root (1) of these scales is the same note as the 1 chord's root. If you want to start playing lead guitar, improvising blues and rock, or writing classic sounding rock tunes, the pentatonic blues scale is definitely the place to start. To play in E, you will need to play at 0 or 12th fret. Both the major and minor blues scales are, essentially, pentatonic scales with an added ‘blue note’. When the pattern is applied as major, the same note in the patterns becomes a … As you’re reading these guitar scale diagrams, remember the following rules. Note the hammer-offs in the first bar. The additional note is a 'spice' that works great in a Blues soup, but too much and it can make your soup a little sour. The 5♭ note, or blue note, adds tension to the sound of the blues scale, and is very popular in blues music, hence the name. This final riff adds a short pentatonic intro to the riff used in lick 2 above. It really is an easy way to play a handful of notes that sound GREAT right from the get go. Basic blues guitar scales - embellishing minor pentatonic These scales work well over both major and minor key blues progressions. The Melodic Minor Scale. As the ‘pent’ prefix implies, this scale has just five notes, so is simpler than a typical major or minor scale (they have seven notes) – it’s basically a slimmed down minor scale, missing the 2nd and 6th notes. Some people find it easier to remember scales in terms of box shape, others prefer thinking up and down the scale on a single string. These really do offer a great deal of color over and above the standard pentatonic scale. Required fields are marked *. It’s a great riff for call and response with a vocalist, and is exceptionally easy, using just three different notes. In the diagram above, the blue dots represent the root note. Your email address will not be published. Please note: JavaScript is required to post comments.